The 11 Ways of Preventing Pregnancy Plus Effectiveness and Side Effects

THE 11 WAYS OF PREVENTING PREGNANCY PLUS EFFECTIVENESS AND SIDE EFFECTS

There are 3 approaches to family planning; the one approach is when the male uses a pregnancy prevention barrier or practice; another approach is when the woman uses the pregnancy prevention device or practice while the last approach is when both male and female use the pregnancy prevention device or practice.

Within the 3 approaches are the 11 ways of preventing pregnancy, their effectiveness, ability to prevent sexually transmitted diseases and attendant side effects.

 

THE FEMALE APPROACH IN PREVENTING PREGNANCY

The Mucus Check

The mucus check involves examining the vagina fluid to understand the periods within which a woman may likely get pregnant.

This method may be more or less effective and reliable 2 out of 4 times in preventing pregnancy.

It has no attendant side effects.

Do not prevent sexually transmitted diseases.

 

The Diaphragm Insert

This involves inserting a diaphragm device deep inside the vagina that act as a blockade to prevent sperm from getting to the eggs and forestalling pregnancy.

The effectiveness of this method is 2 out of 4 times more or less in preventing pregnancy.

There is no direct and applicable side effects.

It does not prevent all sexually transmitted diseases.

 

The Female Condom Use

The female condom is inserted into the vagina to act as a barrier to block sperm from getting into the female reproductive system thereby preventing pregnancy.

This method is 2 out of 4 times effective more or less in preventing pregnancy.

There is no direct and applicable side effects except that it becomes less effective when the woman is on top of the man.

There is reasonable prevention of sexually transmitted diseases but not completely.

 

The Hormonal Methods

This method involves the use of birth control pill, injections, patches and implants that regulate hormones to prevent pregnancy.

Birth control pills, Patch and Injections are effective 3 out of 4 times of use, while Implants 4 out of 4 times of use in preventing pregnancy.

Side effects includes nausea, headaches and irregular bleeding in terms of time and blood flow; also not suitable for women with established health problems.

These methods do not prevent sexually transmitted diseases of any kind.

 

Brest Feeding Practice

This is when exclusive breast feeding is practiced by a mother from the point of delivery up till 6 months and when within such period there is no monthly flow.

Exclusive breast feeding is effective 2 out of 4 times more or less in preventing pregnancy.

There are no attendant or applicable side effects.

This does not stop sexually transmitted diseases.

 

Spermicide Application

This involves the application of a spermicidal cream either on its own or to the diaphragm or the female condom as a supporting measure for their effectiveness.

The effectiveness of spermicide on its own is 1 out 4 times of its use in preventing pregnancy and may increase the effectiveness of the female condom or the diaphragm more than it should have been.

Side effects are in form of skin allergic reactions.

Spermicide do not prevent sexually transmitted diseases.

 

Intra Uterine Device (IUD)

This is a T-shape device inserted into the womb (uterus) to prevent pregnancy; it is also popularly called the coil.

The coil or IUD is 4 out of 4 times effective in preventing pregnancy when used.

Painful menstruation, heavy menstrual flow are evident side effects; may pose a health problem to some women and sometimes cause slight shock sensation to male partners.

In all it do not prevent sexually transmitted diseases.

 

THE MALE APPROACH IN PREVENTING PREGNANCY

Pull Out Practice

This is also refer to as the withdrawal practice and it is when the male partner withdraw from inside the female before ejaculating.

This method is probably effective 1 out of 4 times of its use more or less in preventing pregnancy provided there has been no slight drip of sperm during the intercourse.

There are practically no side effects with the Pull Out practice.

Each of both partners are vulnerable to sexually transmitted diseases.

 

Male Condom Use

The male condom is a latex rubber device worn over the penis that holds sperm and prevent pregnancy when used correctly.

The male condom is effective 2 out of 4 times of use more or less in preventing pregnancy.

There are no established side effects with the use of condoms.

Condoms reasonable prevent sexually transmitted diseases when used correctly.

 

THE MALE AND FEMALE APPROACH IN PREVENTING PREGNANCY

The Sex Without Intercourse Practice

This is when sexual intercourse is done with little clothing on and without at any time having the penis inside the vagina.

This practice is effective 4 out of 4 times in preventing pregnancy.

There are no side effects of any kind.

The sex without intercourse practice does not totally prevent sexually transmitted disease if fluid that sip through clothing touches the skin of either partner.

 

Sterilization Method

This is a permanent family planning procedure that can never be reversed after carrying out the operation and could be done by either or both partners.

Sterilization method is effective 4 out of 4 times in preventing pregnancy.

There are no established side effects.

Sterilization procedure does not prevent sexually transmitted disease.

 

Credit – Where there is no doctor.

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